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Running Bitcoin - Bitcoin Wiki Bitcoin.conf addnode

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From Bitcoin Wiki

There are two variations of the original bitcoin program available; one with a graphical user interface (usually referred to as just “Bitcoin”), and a 'headless' version (called bitcoind). They are completely compatible with each other, and take the same command-line arguments, read the same configuration file, and read and write the same data files. You can run one copy of either Bitcoin or bitcoind on your system at a time (if you accidently try to launch another, the copy will let you know that Bitcoin or bitcoind is already running and will exit).

Linux Quickstart

The simplest way to start from scratch with the command line client, automatically syncing blockchain and creating a wallet, is to just run this command (without arguments) from the directory containing your bitcoind binary:

 ./bitcoind

To run with the standard GUI interface:

 ./bitcoin-qt

Command-line arguments

These commands are accurate as of Bitcoin Core version v0.14.0.

Command Description
-? Print this help message and exit
-version Print version and exit
-alertnotify= Execute command when a relevant alert is received or we see a really long fork (%s in cmd is replaced by message)
-blocknotify= Execute command when the best block changes (%s in cmd is replaced by block hash)
-assumevalid= If this block is in the chain assume that it and its ancestors are valid and potentially skip their script verification (0 to verify all, default: 00000000000000000013176bf8d7dfeab4e1db31dc93bc311b436e82ab226b90, testnet: 00000000000128796ee387cf110ccb9d2f36cffaf7f73079c995377c65ac0dcc)
-conf= Specify configuration file (default: bitcoin.conf)
-datadir= Specify data directory
-dbcache= Set database cache size in megabytes (4 to 16384, default: 300)
-loadblock= Imports blocks from external blk000??.dat file on startup
-maxorphantx= Keep at most unconnectable transactions in memory (default: 100)
-maxmempool= Keep the transaction memory pool below megabytes (default: 300)
-mempoolexpiry= Do not keep transactions in the mempool longer than hours (default: 336)
-blockreconstructionextratxn= Extra transactions to keep in memory for compact block reconstructions (default: 100)
-par= Set the number of script verification threads (-2 to 16, 0 = auto, <0 = leave that many cores free, default: 0)
-pid= Specify pid file (default: bitcoind.pid)
-prune= Reduce storage requirements by enabling pruning (deleting) of old blocks. This allows the pruneblockchain RPC to be called to delete specific blocks, and enables automatic pruning of old blocks if a target size in MiB is provided. This mode is incompatible with -txindex and -rescan. Warning: Reverting this setting requires re-downloading the entire blockchain. (default: 0 = disable pruning blocks, 1 = allow manual pruning via RPC, >550 = automatically prune block files to stay under the specified target size in MiB)
-reindex-chainstate Rebuild chain state from the currently indexed blocks
-reindex Rebuild chain state and block index from the blk*.dat files on disk
-sysperms Create new files with system default permissions, instead of umask 077 (only effective with disabled wallet functionality)
-txindex Maintain a full transaction index, used by the getrawtransaction rpc call (default: 0)

Connection options:
-addnode= Add a node to connect to and attempt to keep the connection open
-banscore= Threshold for disconnecting misbehaving peers (default: 100)
-bantime= Number of seconds to keep misbehaving peers from reconnecting (default: 86400)
-bind= Bind to given address and always listen on it. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6
-connect= Connect only to the specified node(s); -noconnect or -connect=0 alone to disable automatic connections
-discover Discover own IP addresses (default: 1 when listening and no -externalip or -proxy)
-dns Allow DNS lookups for -addnode, -seednode and -connect (default: 1)
-dnsseed Query for peer addresses via DNS lookup, if low on addresses (default: 1 unless -connect/-noconnect)
-externalip= Specify your own public address
-forcednsseed Always query for peer addresses via DNS lookup (default: 0)
-listen Accept connections from outside (default: 1 if no -proxy or -connect/-noconnect)
-listenonion Automatically create Tor hidden service (default: 1)
-maxconnections= Maintain at most connections to peers (default: 125)
-maxreceivebuffer= Maximum per-connection receive buffer, *1000 bytes (default: 5000)
-maxsendbuffer= Maximum per-connection send buffer, *1000 bytes (default: 1000)
-maxtimeadjustment Maximum allowed median peer time offset adjustment. Local perspective of time may be influenced by peers forward or backward by this amount. (default: 4200 seconds)
-onion= Use separate SOCKS5 proxy to reach peers via Tor hidden services (default: -proxy)
-onlynet= Only connect to nodes in network (ipv4, ipv6 or onion)
-permitbaremultisig Relay non-P2SH multisig (default: 1)
-peerbloomfilters Support filtering of blocks and transaction with bloom filters (default: 1)
-port= Listen for connections on (default: 8333 or testnet: 18333)
-proxy= Connect through SOCKS5 proxy
-proxyrandomize Randomize credentials for every proxy connection. This enables Tor stream isolation (default: 1)
-rpcserialversion Sets the serialization of raw transaction or block hex returned in non-verbose mode, non-segwit(0) or segwit(1) (default: 1)
-seednode= Connect to a node to retrieve peer addresses, and disconnect
-timeout= Specify connection timeout in milliseconds (minimum: 1, default: 5000)
-torcontrol=: Tor control port to use if onion listening enabled (default: 127.0.0.1:9051)
-torpassword= Tor control port password (default: empty)
-upnp= Use UPnP to map the listening port (default: 0)
-whitebind= Bind to given address and whitelist peers connecting to it. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6
-whitelist= Whitelist peers connecting from the given IP address (e.g. 1.2.3.4) or CIDR notated network (e.g. 1.2.3.0/24). Can be specified multiple times. Whitelisted peers cannot be DoS banned and their transactions are always relayed, even if they are already in the mempool, useful e.g. for a gateway
-whitelistrelay Accept relayed transactions received from whitelisted peers even when not relaying transactions (default: 1)
-whitelistforcerelay Force relay of transactions from whitelisted peers even if they violate local relay policy (default: 1)
-maxuploadtarget= Tries to keep outbound traffic under the given target (in MiB per 24h), 0 = no limit (default: 0)

Wallet options:
-disablewallet Do not load the wallet and disable wallet RPC calls
-keypool= Set key pool size to (default: 100)
-fallbackfee= A fee rate (in BTC/kB) that will be used when fee estimation has insufficient data (default: 0.0002)
-mintxfee= Fees (in BTC/kB) smaller than this are considered zero fee for transaction creation (default: 0.00001)
-paytxfee= Fee (in BTC/kB) to add to transactions you send (default: 0.00)
-rescan Rescan the block chain for missing wallet transactions on startup
-salvagewallet Attempt to recover private keys from a corrupt wallet on startup
-spendzeroconfchange Spend unconfirmed change when sending transactions (default: 1)
-txconfirmtarget= If paytxfee is not set, include enough fee so transactions begin confirmation on average within n blocks (default: 6)
-usehd Use hierarchical deterministic key generation (HD) after BIP32. Only has effect during wallet creation/first start (default: 1)
-walletrbf Send transactions with full-RBF opt-in enabled (default: 0)
-upgradewallet Upgrade wallet to latest format on startup
-wallet= Specify wallet file (within data directory) (default: wallet.dat)
-walletbroadcast Make the wallet broadcast transactions (default: 1)
-walletnotify= Execute command when a wallet transaction changes (%s in cmd is replaced by TxID)
-zapwallettxes= Delete all wallet transactions and only recover those parts of the blockchain through -rescan on startup (1 = keep tx meta data e.g. account owner and payment request information, 2 = drop tx meta data)

ZeroMQ notification options:
-zmqpubhashblock= Enable publish hash block in
-zmqpubhashtx= Enable publish hash transaction in
-zmqpubrawblock= Enable publish raw block in
-zmqpubrawtx= Enable publish raw transaction in

Debugging/Testing options:
-uacomment= Append comment to the user agent string
-debug= Output debugging information (default: 0, supplying is optional). If is not supplied or if = 1, output all debugging information. can be: addrman, alert, bench, cmpctblock, coindb, db, http, libevent, lock, mempool, mempoolrej, net, proxy, prune, rand, reindex, rpc, selectcoins, tor, zmq, qt.
-help-debug Show all debugging options (usage: --help -help-debug)
-logips Include IP addresses in debug output (default: 0)
-logtimestamps Prepend debug output with timestamp (default: 1)
-minrelaytxfee= Fees (in BTC/kB) smaller than this are considered zero fee for relaying, mining and transaction creation (default: 0.00001)
-maxtxfee= Maximum total fees (in BTC) to use in a single wallet transaction or raw transaction; setting this too low may abort large transactions (default: 0.10)
-printtoconsole Send trace/debug info to console instead of debug.log file
-shrinkdebugfile Shrink debug.log file on client startup (default: 1 when no -debug)

Chain selection options:
-testnet Use the test chain

Node relay options:
-bytespersigop Equivalent bytes per sigop in transactions for relay and mining (default: 20)
-datacarrier Relay and mine data carrier transactions (default: 1)
-datacarriersize Maximum size of data in data carrier transactions we relay and mine (default: 83)
-mempoolreplacement Enable transaction replacement in the memory pool (default: 1)

Block creation options:
-blockmaxweight= Set maximum BIP141 block weight (default: 3000000)
-blockmaxsize= Set maximum block size in bytes (default: 750000)
-blockprioritysize= Set maximum size of high-priority/low-fee transactions in bytes (default: 0)
-blockmintxfee= Set lowest fee rate (in BTC/kB) for transactions to be included in block creation. (default: 0.00001)

RPC server options:
-server Accept command line and JSON-RPC commands
-rest Accept public REST requests (default: 0)
-rpcbind= Bind to given address to listen for JSON-RPC connections. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6. This option can be specified multiple times (default: bind to all interfaces)
-rpccookiefile= Location of the auth cookie (default: data dir)
-rpcuser= Username for JSON-RPC connections
-rpcpassword= Password for JSON-RPC connections
-rpcauth= Username and hashed password for JSON-RPC connections. The field comes in the format: :$. A canonical python script is included in share/rpcuser. The client then connects normally using the rpcuser=/rpcpassword= pair of arguments. This option can be specified multiple times
-rpcport= Listen for JSON-RPC connections on (default: 8332 or testnet: 18332)
-rpcallowip= Allow JSON-RPC connections from specified source. Valid for are a single IP (e.g. 1.2.3.4), a network/netmask (e.g. 1.2.3.4/255.255.255.0) or a network/CIDR (e.g. 1.2.3.4/24). This option can be specified multiple times
-rpcthreads= Set the number of threads to service RPC calls (default: 4)

UI Options:
-choosedatadir Choose data directory on startup (default: 0)
-lang= Set language, for example "de_DE" (default: system locale)
-min Start minimized
-rootcertificates= Set SSL root certificates for payment request (default: -system-)
-splash Show splash screen on startup (default: 1)
-resetguisettings Reset all settings changed in the GUI

Many of the boolean options can also be set to off by specifying them with a "no" prefix: e.g. -nodnseed.

Bitcoin.conf Configuration File

All command-line options (except for -conf) may be specified in a configuration file, and all configuration file options may also be specified on the command line. Command-line options override values set in the configuration file.

The configuration file is a list of setting=value pairs, one per line, with optional comments starting with the '#' character.

The configuration file is not automatically created; you can create it using your favorite plain-text editor. A user-friendly configuration file generator is available here. By default, Bitcoin (or bitcoind) will look for a file named 'bitcoin.conf' in the bitcoin data directory, but both the data directory and the configuration file path may be changed using the -datadir and -conf command-line arguments.

Operating System Default bitcoin datadir Typical path to configuration file
Windows  %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\ C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf
Linux $HOME/.bitcoin/ /home/username/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Mac OSX $HOME/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/ /Users/username/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/bitcoin.conf

Note: if running Bitcoin in testnet mode, the sub-folder "testnet" will be appended to the data directory automatically.

Sample Bitcoin.conf

Copied from https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/contrib/debian/examples/bitcoin.conf:

##
## bitcoin.conf configuration file. Lines beginning with # are comments.
## # Network-related settings: # Run on the test network instead of the real bitcoin network.
#testnet=0 # Run a regression test network
#regtest=0 # Connect via a SOCKS5 proxy
#proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 # Bind to given address and always listen on it. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6
#bind= # Bind to given address and whitelist peers connecting to it. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6
#whitebind= ##############################################################
## Quick Primer on addnode vs connect ##
## Let's say for instance you use addnode=4.2.2.4 ##
## addnode will connect you to and tell you about the ##
## nodes connected to 4.2.2.4. In addition it will tell ##
## the other nodes connected to it that you exist so ##
## they can connect to you. ##
## connect will not do the above when you 'connect' to it. ##
## It will *only* connect you to 4.2.2.4 and no one else.##
## ##
## So if you're behind a firewall, or have other problems ##
## finding nodes, add some using 'addnode'. ##
## ##
## If you want to stay private, use 'connect' to only ##
## connect to "trusted" nodes. ##
## ##
## If you run multiple nodes on a LAN, there's no need for ##
## all of them to open lots of connections. Instead ##
## 'connect' them all to one node that is port forwarded ##
## and has lots of connections. ##
## Thanks goes to [Noodle] on Freenode. ##
############################################################## # Use as many addnode= settings as you like to connect to specific peers
#addnode=69.164.218.197
#addnode=10.0.0.2:8333 # Alternatively use as many connect= settings as you like to connect ONLY to specific peers
#connect=69.164.218.197
#connect=10.0.0.1:8333 # Listening mode, enabled by default except when 'connect' is being used
#listen=1 # Maximum number of inbound+outbound connections.
#maxconnections= #
# JSON-RPC options (for controlling a running Bitcoin/bitcoind process)
# # server=1 tells Bitcoin-Qt and bitcoind to accept JSON-RPC commands
#server=0 # Bind to given address to listen for JSON-RPC connections. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6.
# This option can be specified multiple times (default: bind to all interfaces)
#rpcbind= # If no rpcpassword is set, rpc cookie auth is sought. The default `-rpccookiefile` name
# is .cookie and found in the `-datadir` being used for bitcoind. This option is typically used
# when the server and client are run as the same user.
#
# If not, you must set rpcuser and rpcpassword to secure the JSON-RPC api. The first
# method(DEPRECATED) is to set this pair for the server and client:
#rpcuser=Ulysseys
#rpcpassword=YourSuperGreatPasswordNumber_DO_NOT_USE_THIS_OR_YOU_WILL_GET_ROBBED_385593
#
# The second method `rpcauth` can be added to server startup argument. It is set at intialization time
# using the output from the script in share/rpcuser/rpcuser.py after providing a username:
#
# ./share/rpcuser/rpcuser.py alice
# String to be appended to bitcoin.conf:
# rpcauth=alice:f7efda5c189b999524f151318c0c86$d5b51b3beffbc02b724e5d095828e0bc8b2456e9ac8757ae3211a5d9b16a22ae
# Your password:
# DONT_USE_THIS_YOU_WILL_GET_ROBBED_8ak1gI25KFTvjovL3gAM967mies3E=
#
# On client-side, you add the normal user/password pair to send commands:
#rpcuser=alice
#rpcpassword=DONT_USE_THIS_YOU_WILL_GET_ROBBED_8ak1gI25KFTvjovL3gAM967mies3E=
#
# You can even add multiple entries of these to the server conf file, and client can use any of them:
# rpcauth=bob:b2dd077cb54591a2f3139e69a897ac$4e71f08d48b4347cf8eff3815c0e25ae2e9a4340474079f55705f40574f4ec99 # How many seconds bitcoin will wait for a complete RPC HTTP request.
# after the HTTP connection is established. #rpcclienttimeout=30 # By default, only RPC connections from localhost are allowed.
# Specify as many rpcallowip= settings as you like to allow connections from other hosts,
# either as a single IPv4/IPv6 or with a subnet specification. # NOTE: opening up the RPC port to hosts outside your local trusted network is NOT RECOMMENDED,
# because the rpcpassword is transmitted over the network unencrypted. # server=1 tells Bitcoin-Qt to accept JSON-RPC commands.
# it is also read by bitcoind to determine if RPC should be enabled #rpcallowip=10.1.1.34/255.255.255.0
#rpcallowip=1.2.3.4/24
#rpcallowip=2001:db8:85a3:0:0:8a2e:370:7334/96 # Listen for RPC connections on this TCP port:
#rpcport=8332 # You can use Bitcoin or bitcoind to send commands to Bitcoin/bitcoind
# running on another host using this option:
#rpcconnect=127.0.0.1 # Create transactions that have enough fees so they are likely to begin confirmation within n blocks (default: 6).
# This setting is over-ridden by the -paytxfee option.
#txconfirmtarget=n # Miscellaneous options # Pre-generate this many public/private key pairs, so wallet backups will be valid for
# both prior transactions and several dozen future transactions.
#keypool=100 # Pay an optional transaction fee every time you send bitcoins. Transactions with fees
# are more likely than free transactions to be included in generated blocks, so may
# be validated sooner.
#paytxfee=0.00 # Enable pruning to reduce storage requirements by deleting old blocks. # This mode is incompatible with -txindex and -rescan.
# 0 = default (no pruning).
# 1 = allows manual pruning via RPC.
# >=550 = target to stay under in MiB. #prune=550 # User interface options # Start Bitcoin minimized
#min=1 # Minimize to the system tray
#minimizetotray=1

Platforms

Windows

Start automatically

To configure the Bitcoin client to start automatically:

You might use the configuration-file, or the GUI-Settings:

Settings -> Options

then mark the checkbox titled:

[X] Start Bitcoin on system startup

Batch automation

To work with batch, you have to start the daemon (bitcoind.exe). The bitcoin.exe run with option "-server" will respond with GUI-messages you are not able to process its answers.

Mac

Linux

See Also

Это интересно:

Wallet no sync? - CRYPTOCURRENCYTALK.COM

Provided by: bitcoind_0.3.24~dfsg-1_i386
 bitcoin.conf - bitcoin configuration file 
 All command-line options (except for '-datadir' and '-conf') may be specified in a configuration file, and all configuration file options may also be specified on the command line. Command-line options override values set in the configuration file. The configuration file is a list of 'setting=value' pairs, one per line, with optional comments starting with the '#' character. The configuration file is not automatically created; you can create it using your favorite plain-text editor. By default, bitcoind(1) will look for a file named bitcoin.conf(5) in the bitcoin data directory, but both the data directory and the configuration file path may be changed using the '-datadir' and '-conf' command-line arguments. 
 bitcoin.conf should be located in $HOME/.bitcoin 
 testnet=['1'|'0'] Enable or disable run on the test network instead of the real *bitcoin* network. proxy='127.0.0.1:9050' Connect via a socks4 proxy. addnode='10.0.0.2:8333' Use as many *addnode=* settings as you like to connect to specific peers. connect='10.0.0.1:8333' Use as many *connect=* settings as you like to connect ONLY to specific peers. noirc=['1'|'0'] Use or Do not use Internet Relay Chat (irc.lfnet.org #bitcoin channel) to find other peers. maxconnections='value' Maximum number of inbound+outbound connections. 
 server=['1'|'0'] Tells *bitcoin* to accept or not accept JSON-RPC commands. rpcuser='username' You must set *rpcuser* to secure the JSON-RPC api. rpcpassword='password' You must set *rpcpassword* to secure the JSON-RPC api. rpctimeout='30' How many seconds *bitcoin* will wait for a complete RPC HTTP request, after the HTTP connection is established. rpcallowip='192.168.1.*' By default, only RPC connections from localhost are allowed. Specify as many *rpcallowip=* settings as you like to allow connections from other hosts (and you may use * as a wildcard character). rpcport='8332' Listen for RPC connections on this TCP port. rpcconnect='127.0.0.1' You can use *bitcoin* or *bitcoind(1)* to send commands to *bitcoin*/*bitcoind(1)* running on another host using this option. rpcssl='1' Use Secure Sockets Layer (also known as TLS or HTTPS) to communicate with *bitcoin* '-server' or *bitcoind(1)*. Example of OpenSSL settings used when *rpcssl*='1': rpcsslciphers='TLSv1+HIGH:!SSLv2:!aNULL:!eNULL:!AH:!3DES:@STRENGTH' rpcsslcertificatechainfile='server.cert' rpcsslprivatekeyfile='server.pem' MISCELLANEOUS OPTIONS gen=['0'|'1'] Enable or disable attempt to generate bitcoins. 4way=['0'|'1'] Enable or disable use SSE instructions to try to generate bitcoins faster. keypool='100' Pre-generate this many public/private key pairs, so wallet backups will be valid for both prior transactions and several dozen future transactions. paytxfee='0.00' Pay an optional transaction fee every time you send bitcoins. Transactions with fees are more likely than free transactions to be included in generated blocks, so may be validated sooner. allowreceivebyip='1' Allow direct connections for the 'pay via IP address' feature. USER INTERFACE OPTIONS min=['0'|'1'] Enable or disable start bitcoind minimized. minimizetotray=['0'|'1'] Enable or disable minimize to the system tray. 
 bitcoind(1) 
 This manual page was written by Micah Anderson  for the Debian system (but may be used by others). Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU General Public License, Version 3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation. On Debian systems, the complete text of the GNU General Public License can be found in /usr/share/common-licenses/GPL.
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From Bitcoin Wiki

This is a list of nodes which are considered reliable.

How to use this list

Connect to nodes

You can connect to these nodes with the -addnode=ip switch instead of the usual node harvesting process (through IRC or via the embedded nodelist). You can connect to more than one node by using -addnode=ip more than once. It is usually a good idea to connect to more than one of these nodes.

Nodes without a fixed ip

If the node IP is not fixed (see "Fixed" column), you will have to resolve the node's name (first column) each time the IP changes. Some nodes may have their ip change once a day, some others once a month, and some others may stay on the same IP for years. Still, as long as the IP is not fixed, there is no guarantee it will stay the same.

In order to enable hostname lookups for the -addnode and -connect parameters, you must additionally provide the -dns parameter. Example:

bitcoind -dns -addnode=bitcoin.es

Versions prior to 0.3.22 do not support hostnames to the -addnode parameter, so you must do the resolving part for it. For example on linux:

bitcoind -addnode=$(dig +short bitcoin.es)

IP Transactions

Bitcoin Core versions prior to 0.8.0 also could send IP Transactions to these nodes. If you included your bitcoin address in the "message" field, you might have had your coins back.

Tor network

To use Bitcoin-Qt over Tor hidden services, in a terminal/console enter:

bitcoin-qt -proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 -onlynet=tor

To use Bitcoin with one specific Tor node, run

bitcoin-qt -proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 -connect=abcde.onion

, where abcde.onion needs to be substituted with one of the Tor nodes below. These parameters can be added to bitcoin.conf to make them permanent.

You can find detailed information on running clients and hidden services within Tor in the documentation.

Nodes list

IPv4 Nodes

This entire list was last checked on 2017-11-15.

Hostname Owner IP Fixed Status Last Seen (GMT) Accepts IP transactions
bitcoin.moneypot.com moneypot 212.47.228.216 Yes Down 2015-09-15 No
node.bitcoin.xxx Bitcoin.xxx 66.228.49.201 Yes Down 2014-08-28 Yes
bitcoin.coinprism.com Coinprism 137.116.225.142 Yes Down 2014-04-26 Yes
btcnode1.evolyn.net Evolyn 85.214.251.25 Yes Down 2014-01-26 Yes
InductiveSoul.US Inductive Soul 67.186.224.85 Yes Down 2013-11-13 Yes
archivum.info Ferraro Ltd. 88.198.58.172 Yes Down Yes
62.75.216.13 exMULTI, Inc. 62.75.216.13 Yes Down No
69.64.34.118 exMULTI, Inc. 69.64.34.118 Yes Down No
79.160.221.140 K-Norway 79.160.221.140 Yes Down Yes
netzbasis.de unknown3 81.169.129.25 Yes Down Yes
btc.turboadmin.com osmosis 98.143.152.14 Yes Down No
fallback.bitcoin.zhoutong.com Zhou Tong 117.121.241.140 Yes Down No
bauhaus.csail.mit.edu imsaguy 128.30.96.44 Yes Down Yes
jun.dashjr.org Luke-Jr 173.242.112.53 Yes Up () 2017-11-15
cheaperinbitcoins.com Xenland/Shane 184.154.36.82 Yes Down Yes
django.webflows.fr unknown2 188.165.213.169 Yes Down Yes
204.9.55.71 toasty 204.9.55.71 Yes Down Yes
btcnode.novit.ro ovidiusoft - novit.ro 93.187.142.114 No Down Yes
porgressbar.sk progressbar hackerspace 91.210.181.21 Yes Down Yes
faucet.bitcoin.st bitcoin street 64.27.57.225 Yes Down Yes
bitcoin.securepayment.cc SecurePayment CC 63.247.147.163 Yes Down Yes
www.dcscdn.com Danw12 199.115.228.181 Yes Down
ns2.dcscdn.com Danw12 199.115.228.182 Yes Down
coin.soul-dev.com Soul-Dev Down
messier.bzfx.net BZFX/A Meteorite 91.121.205.50 Yes Down
btcnode1.bitgroup.cc BitGroup 198.211.116.191 Yes Down Yes
btcnode2.bitgroup.cc BitGroup 162.243.120.138 Yes Down Yes
btcnode3.bitgroup.cc BitGroup 95.85.8.237 Yes Down Yes
btcnode.xiro.co Xiro Labs 91.121.108.61 Yes Up () 2017-11-15 No
stuff.liam-w.io Liam W 185.122.57.203 Yes Down No
bitcoin.bitdonut.co James Hartig Down
coinno.de jaknam Down
82.165.44.44 anonymous Down
bitcoin1.dassori.me gdassori Down
bitcoin2.dassori.me gdassori Down
blockchainnode.meulie.net Evert Up () 2017-11-15
fullnode.fybsg.com Nagato Down
n.bitcoin-fr.io Arthur 62.210.66.227 Up () 2017-11-15
softnet.homenet.org Victorsueca 90.71.117.90 Down
mars.jordandoyle.uk Jordan Doyle 91.121.83.82 Yes Down Yes

IPv6 Nodes

Hostname Owner IP Fixed Status Last Seen (GMT) Accepts IP transactions
InductiveSoul.US Inductive Soul 2601:7:6680:2ac:4d29:40ff:7513:fcc7 Yes Up () 11-13-2013 (MDY) Yes
caffeinator.net Atrophy Up () 2013-05-10
2001:470:8:2e1::40  ? 2001:470:8:2e1::40 Yes Down Yes
messier.bzfx.net BZFX/A Meteorite 2001:41d0:1:d632::1 Yes Up ()
stuff.liam-w.io Liam W 2a06:8ec0:3::1:2e47 Yes Up () No
bitcoin.bitdonut.co James Hartig
n.bitcoin-fr.io Arthur 2001:bc8:c087:2001::1
mars.jordandoyle.uk Jordan Doyle

Tor nodes

This entire list was last checked on 2017-11-15.

Hostname Owner Status Last Seen (GMT) Accepts IP transactions
gyn2vguc35viks2b.onion ChievOk Up 2017-11-15 No
kvd44sw7skb5folw.onion ChievOk Up 2017-11-15 No
nkf5e6b7pl4jfd4a.onion BlueMatt Up 2017-11-15 No
yu7sezmixhmyljn4.onion Victorsueca Up 2017-11-15  ?

Adding a node

Before adding yourself as a fallback node, you should be sure your node will stay online for a long time. If a node is offline for more than 24 hours it will be removed from the list.

To add a node in this list, you just need the ip/hostname and your name, the other fields will be filled automatically. Insert the following lines before the END NODELIST line:

|-
| ip || your name

See Also

блок биткоин кэша.

Bitcoin Core Counterparty

In this chapter we will install what is called a full node.

A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.

Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network — they’ll have to use centralized services instead.

Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources — but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.

The full node will be reachable over IPv4, IPv6 and as Hidden Service over the Tor network.

The Bitcoin blockchain is very large and grows constantly. This is because every Bitcoin mined and every transaction ever made is recorded in the blockchain.

As of April 2015 it is 32 Gigabytes. Along with indexes and other data a full node occupies around 42 GB (Gigabytes) of disk storage space on the server.

You can see the growth of the blockchain over time on the Bitcoin Blockchain Size website.

To check the available free space of the disk who will hold the Bitcoin database:

$ df -h /var/lib
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/server--vg-root 456G 102G 331G 24% /

You can check the diskspace used by a running your full node as follows:

$ sudo du -hs /var/lib/bitcoind/*|sort -h
0 /var/lib/bitcoind/db.log
20K /var/lib/bitcoind/fee_estimates.dat
84K /var/lib/bitcoind/wallet.dat
212K /var/lib/bitcoind/debug.log
952K /var/lib/bitcoind/peers.dat
732M /var/lib/bitcoind/chainstate
41G /var/lib/bitcoind/blocks

This guide assumes we allocate the following IP addresses for our Bitcoin daemon:

  • 2001:db8::39 as global public IPv6 address;
  • 192.0.2.39 as private local IPv4 address (port forwarded from the public IPv4 address);
  • 198.51.100.240 as the ISP provided dynamic public Internet address;

To add the IP addresses on the server:

$ sudo ip addr add 192.0.2.39/24 dev eth0
$ sudo ip addr add 2001:db8::39/64 dev eth0

Also add them to the file /etc/network/interfaces to make them persistent across system restarts:

# btc.example.net
iface eth0 inet static address 192.0.2.39/24
iface eth0 inet6 static address 2001:db8::39/64
Name Type Content Priority TTL
btc A 198.51.100.240   300
btc AAAA 2001:db8::39    

Check the “Add also reverse record” when adding the IPv6 entry.

Bitcoin daemons listen on TCP ports 8333 and 18333 for incoming connections.

IPv4 NAT port forwarding:

Protocol Port No. Forward To Description
TCP 8333 192.0.2.39 Bitcoin network
TCP 18333 192.0.2.39 Bitcoin test network

Allowed IPv6 connections:

Protocol Port No. Destination Description
TCP 8333 2001:db8::39 Bitcoin network
TCP 18333 2001:db8::39 Bitcoin test network

Add a Tor Hidden Service by editing /etc/tor/torrc:

# BitCoin Full Node Hidden Service for btc.example.net
HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/hidden_services/bitcoin
HiddenServicePort 8333
HiddenServicePort 18333

Reload the Tor client:

$ sudo service tor reload

Read the newly generated *.onion hostname:

$ sudo cat /var/lib/tor/hidden_services/bitcoin/hostname
duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion

For security reasons its best to run the daemon with its own unprivileged user profile. Create this user on the server system with the following command:

$ sudo adduser --system --group --home /var/lib/bitcoind bitcoin

The Bitcoin reference software is not in the Ubuntu software packages repository, we therefore add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system before installing the daemon:

$ sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install bitcoind

Create the configuration directory and an empty configuration file and also adjust access rights:

$ sudo mkdir /etc//bitcoin
$ sudo touch /etc/bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
$ sudo chmod 600 /etc/bitcoin/bitcoin.conf

We need a password for remote procedure calls to daemon. The program will create it automatically if started without finding one:

$ bitcoind -conf=/etc/bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Error: To use bitcoind, or the -server option to bitcoin-qt, you must set an rpcpassword in the configuration file:
/etc/bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
It is recommended you use the following random password:
rpcuser=bitcoinrpc
rpcpassword=HkFbv9YaWgEgyy7X4B9vi3GsENtGWgPNpwUf2ehsvXX1
(you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions.
It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems;
for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected]

The long random string displayed is the generated RPC password we need to add to the configuration. Open the file /etc/bitcoin/bitcoin.conf and add them as follows:

#
# Bitcoind Daemon Configuration
# # General options
datadir=/var/lib/bitcoind
alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" root # Connection options
bind=192.0.2.39
bind=[2001:db8::39]
externalip=btc.example.net # Tor Hidden Service Options
onion=127.0.0.1:9150
bind=127.0.0.1
externalip=duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion # Long running Bitcoin Nodes on the Tor Network
# http://nodes.bitcoin.st/tor/
addnode=pqosrh6wfaucet32.onion
addnode=btc4xysqsf3mmab4.onion
addnode=gb5ypqt63du3wfhn.onion
addnode=3lxko7l4245bxhex.onion # Verified Online Bitcoin nodes on the Tor Network from 
# https://rossbennetts.com/2015/04/running-bitcoind-via-tor/
addnode=kjy2eqzk4zwi5zd3.onion
addnode=it2pj4f7657g3rhi.onion # Verified Online Bitcoin nodes on the Tor Network from 
# https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Fallback_Nodes#Tor_nodes
addnode=hhiv5pnxenvbf4am.onion
addnode=bpdlwholl7rnkrkw.onion
addnode=vso3r6cmjoomhhgg.onion
addnode=kjy2eqzk4zwi5zd3.onion # Verified Online Bitcoin nodes on the Tor Network from 
# https://sky-ip.org
addnode=h2vlpudzphzqxutd.onion
addnode=xyp7oeeoptq7jllb.onion # RPC server options
rpcuser=bitcoinrpc
rpcpassword=HkFbv9YaWgEgyy7X4B9vi3GsENtGWgPNpwUf2ehsvXX1 # Maintain a full index of historical transaction IDs
# Required by Electrum Server
txindex=1

After saving, make sure the file is owned by our bitcoin user:

$ sudo chown -R bitcoin:bitcoin /etc/bitcoin

The Bitcoin project recommends running the daemon as Upstart service in Ubuntu and prepared an Upstart script for bitcoind.

Download and install the Upstart Script:

$ cd downloads
$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/0.10/contrib/init/bitcoind.conf
$ sudo cp bitcoind.conf /etc/init/

Start the Service:

$ sudo start bitcoind
bitcoind start/running, process 17019

When started for the first time, bitcoind will search for peers and start to download and process the blockchain.

Note

Depending on many factors like Internet connection bandwidth, disk speed, amount of RAM and CPU speed, it can take several hours or even days days until bitcoind has fully loaded and processed the blockchain.

Follow transactions in the bitcoind debug log:

$ sudo -u bitcoin multitail /var/lib/bitcoind/debug.log

To see if your node is known and reachable in the Bitcoin network got check the Bitnodes website.

Examples:

You can also check your *.onion Tor Hidden Service node, by entering its address in the form at the bottom of the page and click “Check Node” button. However no details will showed except if for the fact that the node is accepting connections or not.

To see transactions which have been processed by your IPv4 node:

  • https://blockchain.info/ip-address/192.0.2.39

IPv6 and Tor Hidden Service Nodes are not supported by blockchain.info.

  • https://rossbennetts.com/2015/04/running-bitcoind-via-tor/

© Copyright 2014, 2017, roll.urown.net - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Last updated on Dec 24, 2017.

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биткоин майнинг форум.

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bitcoin.conf的配置项和自己写bat,配置启动项的配置都一样。

例如bitcoin-qt-testnet.bat内容如下

bitcoin-qt.exe -testnet -datadir=C:\BitcoinData-Testnet -conf=bitcoin.conf -server -rpcuser=username-rpcpassword=password -rpcport=18332 -rpcallowip=* -rpcssl -txindex -lang=en_US

如下是bitcoin.conf包含的配置项

# bitcoin.conf configuration file. Lines beginning with # are comments.     # Network-related settings: # Run on the test network instead of the real bitcoin network. #testnet=0 testnet=0 # Connect via a socks4 proxy #proxy=127.0.0.1:9050 ############################################################## ##            Quick Primer on addnode vs connect            ## ##  Let's say for instance you use addnode=4.2.2.4          ## ##  addnode will connect you to and tell you about the      ## ##    nodes connected to 4.2.2.4.  In addition it will tell ## ##    the other nodes connected to it that you exist so     ## ##    they can connect to you.                              ## ##  connect will not do the above when you 'connect' to it. ## ##    It will *only* connect you to 4.2.2.4 and no one else.## ##                                                          ## ##  So if you're behind a firewall, or have other problems  ## ##  finding nodes, add some using 'addnode'.                ## ##                                                          ## ##  If you want to stay private, use 'connect' to only      ## ##  connect to "trusted" nodes.                             ## ##                                                          ## ##  If you run multiple nodes on a LAN, there's no need for ## ##  all of them to open lots of connections.  Instead       ## ##  'connect' them all to one node that is port forwarded   ## ##  and has lots of connections.                            ## ##       Thanks goes to [Noodle] on Freenode.               ## ############################################################## # Use as many addnode= settings as you like to connect to specific peers #addnode=69.164.218.197 #addnode=10.0.0.2:8333 # ... or use as many connect= settings as you like to connect ONLY # to specific peers: #connect=69.164.218.197 #connect=10.0.0.1:8333 # Maximum number of inbound+outbound connections. #maxconnections= # JSON-RPC options (for controlling a running Bitcoin/bitcoind process) # server=1 tells Bitcoin-QT to accept JSON-RPC commands. #server=0 server=1 # You must set rpcuser and rpcpassword to secure the JSON-RPC api #rpcuser=Ulysseys #rpcpassword=YourSuperGreatPasswordNumber_DO_NOT_USE_THIS_OR_YOU_WILL_GET_ROBBED_385593 rpcuser=RPCuser rpcpassword=RPCpasswd # How many seconds bitcoin will wait for a complete RPC HTTP request. # after the HTTP connection is established.  #rpctimeout=30 # By default, only RPC connections from localhost are allowed.  Specify # as many rpcallowip= settings as you like to allow connections from # other hosts (and you may use * as a wildcard character). # NOTE: opening up the RPC port to hosts outside your local # trusted network is NOT RECOMMENDED, because the rpcpassword # is transmitted over the network unencrypted. #rpcallowip=10.1.1.34 #rpcallowip=192.168.1.* rpcallowip=* # Listen for RPC connections on this TCP port: #rpcport=8332 rpcport=18332 # You can use Bitcoin or bitcoind to send commands to Bitcoin/bitcoind # running on another host using this option: #rpcconnect=127.0.0.1 rpcconnect=127.0.0.1 # Use Secure Sockets Layer (also known as TLS or HTTPS) to communicate # with Bitcoin -server or bitcoind #rpcssl=1 # OpenSSL settings used when rpcssl=1 #rpcsslciphers=TLSv1+HIGH:!SSLv2:!aNULL:!eNULL:!AH:!3DES:@STRENGTH #rpcsslcertificatechainfile=server.cert #rpcsslprivatekeyfile=server.pem # Miscellaneous options # Set gen=1 to attempt to generate bitcoins #gen=0 # Pre-generate this many public/private key pairs, so wallet backups will be valid for # both prior transactions and several dozen future transactions. #keypool=100 # Pay an optional transaction fee every time you send bitcoins.  Transactions with fees # are more likely than free transactions to be included in generated blocks, so may # be validated sooner. #paytxfee=0.00 # Allow direct connections for the 'pay via IP address' feature. #allowreceivebyip=1   # User interface options # Start Bitcoin minimized #min=1 # Minimize to the system tray #minimizetotray=1

bitcoin bankomatas.

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